bigmouthsparesagain:

Beautiful

bigmouthsparesagain:

Beautiful

sparklinghearteyedvenus:

forest of the end, and the beginning by aya takano and azuma makoto

(via toothandnail)

laughingsquid:

Hemingway, A Simple Editing App That Highlights Common Errors and Suggests Alternatives

laughingsquid:

Hemingway, A Simple Editing App That Highlights Common Errors and Suggests Alternatives

nevver:

I was so disappointed…

nevver:

I was so disappointed

explore-blog:

The great Jeanette Winterson on time, writing, and the purpose of art in human life

explore-blog:

The great Jeanette Winterson on time, writing, and the purpose of art in human life

(Source: jona3santi, via bigmouthsparesagain)

(Source: minorcutie, via bigmouthsparesagain)

bigmouthsparesagain:

suicabear:

magnoliasea:

3squirrels:

death-limes:

fatass-mcnotits:

theidealisticcynic:

nudityandnerdery:

It’s unfortunate how many people didn’t take this message away from the debate.

Bill Nye was just SO ENTHUSIASTIC about the topic. You could tell.
For God’s sake, the man was trying to teach people about photosynthesis when asked what his favourite colour was. That’s a man that ADORES science and absolutely loves teaching people.
Suddenly, I was 12 and watching a Bill Nye The Science Guy episode at my grandma’s school while she was decorating the gym.

Bill Nye is like the Mister Roger’s of science
he legitimately cares about what he is talking about and enthusiastically encourages people to take something positive away from it

Bill Nye is the Mister Rogers of science
Bob Ross is the Mister Rogers of art
and Mister Rogers is… well, Mister Rogers
what if they could join forces



oh my god yes please

literally the best image that has ever been on this website

Hi, you’re forgetting someone
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shari_Lewis

bigmouthsparesagain:

suicabear:

magnoliasea:

3squirrels:

death-limes:

fatass-mcnotits:

theidealisticcynic:

nudityandnerdery:

It’s unfortunate how many people didn’t take this message away from the debate.

Bill Nye was just SO ENTHUSIASTIC about the topic. You could tell.

For God’s sake, the man was trying to teach people about photosynthesis when asked what his favourite colour was. That’s a man that ADORES science and absolutely loves teaching people.

Suddenly, I was 12 and watching a Bill Nye The Science Guy episode at my grandma’s school while she was decorating the gym.

Bill Nye is like the Mister Roger’s of science

he legitimately cares about what he is talking about and enthusiastically encourages people to take something positive away from it

Bill Nye is the Mister Rogers of science

Bob Ross is the Mister Rogers of art

and Mister Rogers is… well, Mister Rogers

what if they could join forces

image

oh my god yes please

literally the best image that has ever been on this website

Hi, you’re forgetting someone

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shari_Lewis

(Source: grindlebone)

"Although many writers had had periods of significant depression, mania, or hypomania, they were consistently appealing, entertaining, and interesting people. They had led interesting lives, and they enjoyed telling me about them as much as I enjoyed hearing about them. Mood disorders tend to be episodic, characterized by relatively brief periods of low or high mood lasting weeks to months, interspersed with long periods of normal mood (known as euthymia to us psychiatrists). All the writers were euthymic at the time that I interviewed them, and so they could look back on their periods of depression or mania with considerable detachment. They were also able to describe how abnormalities in mood state affected their creativity. Consistently, they indicated that they were unable to be creative when either depressed or manic."

The relationship between creativity and mental illness – a fascinating study based on writers from the prestigious Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Kurt Vonnegut was among the subjects. (via explore-blog)

nevver:

Everybody’s gone to the Moon

(via nevver)

nevver:

Leave me, Andre Elliott

(Source: andreelliottphoto)

"What is the optimal balance between social immersion and creative solitude? Why does interpersonal conflict so often coincide with innovation? Looking at pairs allows us to grapple with these questions, which are as basic to the human experience as the push and pull of love itself. As a culture, we’ve long been preoccupied with romance. But we should also take seriously something just as important, but long overlooked — creative intimacy."

Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of Powers of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs, considers the end of the sole genius myth in a New York Times op-ed. (Hemingway, of course, would disagree – in his short and spectacular 1954 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, he spoke to the creative value of working alone.)

A side observation: The op-ed seems to be the new-old book trailer. Shenk recently wrote a similar piece for The Atlantic

(via explore-blog)

albeeats:

this city

(Source: leebarguss, via mcmorrowswoods)

9gag:

Oooh Japan, you never fail to amuse me… #9gag

9gag:

Oooh Japan, you never fail to amuse me… #9gag

(Source: questionall, via bigmouthsparesagain)